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J Juhola

As it is a team sport, you can just focus on "smartness" of the game/individual player and forget the nasty part of being an athlete?

I do understand that by training actual stress situations it is higly more likely to allow better decision making during the game. It will matter individially, but most importantly as a team. But then I don't understand the underrating of closed tecnical work and pure physics.

"But again, as floorball is an invasion sport, the key to understand the problem can be found from the interaction of the three players." True, but then no. When you restrict all the possibities to your like, you can say these three white players could have made it better as a group, but actually the only problem here was the weakest link Huppunen, who's receiving was bad and the ball bounced off his blade. The other two made it just fine. The time Huppunen took to correct the error combined that he was unable to raise his head, could have been much less by simply doing closed training for this (enough repeatings to catch the ball and still keeping his head up, faster first two-three steps) and have made it work for the group. You can find the missing time from earlier actions by the other two, but then you have to assume that the opponent would have reacted the same, which is a big, big assumption. By taking that assumption I think you are just as wrong as the people you are trying to be unidentified with, the old school coaches.

As Floorball is a complex game, you can't train for all possible situations as there will always be the aspect of the unknown. Mistakes are being made even by best players, so executing flawless combinations through a whole game isn't possible. When shit happens (and it happens many times within a single game), it would be nice to be fast, strong and have nice ball handling abilities, don't you think?

AjHanninen

The problem is: how does a player know now is the situation to raise your head? After that, he or she also needs to perceive critical information and (inter)act accordingly.

Also, assuming Huppunen was the only player not playing optimally in this situation, he still needs the two other players playing similarly if he "corrects" his playing in a similar setting.

About nasty training: you can easily get hard enough training in representative settings if you really think that is necessary. You may use 2 ends of the rink and the middle and get more than 5+5 players working simultaneously. The intensity sohuld be on the level of actual competition or even higher - at least on the physical dimension.

For a player to improve the physical intensity of his playing, he only needs to work at the high-end of his actual playing. Raising the playing intensity like this will cause higher intensity in the matches. No separate speed or endurance training is necessary if this happens. I think theres a quote from Jose Mourinho or someone else about playing and training intensity, saying a waiter running full intensity with a tray of drinks will not get much faster with sprint training.

AjHanninen

Carvalhal (2001) in Tamarit (2014), said,

“If we want to run a distance at maximum speed, we will do it with high intensity. However, if we want to do that same distance carrying a tray full of glasses, doing that as quickly as possible without dropping any glasses, inevitably this second action, even though slower, will be more intense because it requires high concentration.”

The idea is that the coach can control the intensity of an exercise by regulating the moments and game principles included in a given exercise.

https://www.togsoccer.com/single-post/2016/02/19/Regulating-Intensity-via-Game-Moments

J Juhola

"The problem is: how does a player know now is the situation to raise your head? After that, he or she also needs to perceive critical information and (inter)act accordingly." No, it's not. Huppunen is playing in the wrong series if he doesn't know yet to raise his head having ball in front of his own goal and being under high press. This should be clear since 14 years old. I'm not saying that everybody can do it, but at least everybody know they should. Like Perttu said Huppunen could have observed his surroundings before getting the pass, but in this case it woundn't have mattered as bad receiving took so long to correct that positions on the field could have been altered. Only way to get that information would have been raising his head.

"Also, assuming Huppunen was the only player not playing optimally in this situation, he still needs the two other players playing similarly if he "corrects" his playing in a similar setting." No. There's no two identical play never ever in this game, nor there's no identical closed training situations (speed and position variations on passes, ball bouncing etc.). That is why you shouldn't underrate closed drills as they are the only way to get enough repeats to make muscular memory to work. It's a whole other thing if it's wise to use precious team training time to do this. In any case you can improve team work by making individuals better. I agree that those few times in a week when the whole team is training together, it would be stupid to use that time on closed drills when dealing with adults.

"you can easily get hard enough training in representative settings if you really think that is necessary." Well, something true there, but why waste team time for that? As you know player starts to make bad decisions when tired. To get through the whole 60 minutes without getting tired isn't something you can train just by playing for 60 minutes. For every 60min game you need 120min vomit tasting training with the intensity of not remembering what floorball even is... Maybe it isn't that important with single games, but it has a huge effect on playoffs, when you have no time for recovery. Why give that advantege to your opponent?

"The idea is that the coach can control the intensity of an exercise by regulating the moments and game principles included in a given exercise." With 5x2h=10h usable time every week and maybe 10-20% high intensity training of that(1-2h/week), you can call yourself hobbyist as that won't improve your physical skills, that's just maintain level. To be an athlete is whole other thing, but I won't go there. As long floorball players aren't athletes, there will be no mainstream interest on the game. But that's not just Perttu's fault.

To use any citate from Mourinho, you need to remember they have 8 hours available training time every day (no work, no school) plus football has very little to do with the explosiveness of our game. A citate from Petteri Nykky would be more appreciated here.

Perttu Kytöhonka

I quote myself:

”Usually good discussion and more practice time will solve the problem but sometimes we might identify a specific limiting factor. Then we could plan an individual specific training program (technical, tactical, physical, psychological) in which we try to concentrate on the problem at hand. The individual program shouldn’t in most cases interfere with the team’s training program. We must monitor the player’s development closely and analyse by watching the game if the player develops in the identified moment. If not, we must re-think the individual program and adjust it accordingly, then repeat.
So, there is time and place for individual work also in team sports but it should always respect the game itself.”

So I’m not on a mission to forbid players from practicing outside the team sessions. But, in most cases, it shouldn’t interfere with the team’s training program and should be always worked backwards from the game itself. As an amateur sport, there are also limits what the players can do without getting them fatigued / injured.

In Huppunen’s case regarding his receiving skills, well one key responsibility for a coach is to know his/her players, their strenghts and their limits. You are not right in your assesment.

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